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Beyond Israel's Beaches

Netanya, Eilat, and the Dead Sea show that Israel’s natural beauty extends beyond its sun and surf

For a float in the Dead Sea, remember to wear water shoes; the salt on the sea bottom is not easy on the feet.
While the draw of Israel’s beaches cannot be denied, limiting your vacation to sunbathing and
swimming sells the coastal destinations short. Year-round, Israel’s most popular seaside regions offer unique experiences that promise to be more memorable than burying your feet in the sand.

Netanya on Horseback
This city just 20 miles north of Tel Aviv boasts nine miles of beaches and a large community of English-speaking tourists, making it an ideal place to recharge from the hustle and bustle of big city sightseeing. Ranches in Netanya, like the Cactus Ranch, give travelers a chance to soak up the beauty of the coastline on horseback. Arrange for guided group tours, kids’ pony rides, or a little romance at sunset.

Dive with Dolphins in Eilat
The desert landscape and crystal-clear waters of Eilat, Israel’s southernmost city, are a must-see – as is the array of aquatic life that calls the coral reef home. Few sea creatures are as loveable as dolphins and the ecological site, Dolphin Reef, allows visitors a rare opportunity to watch the marine mammals in their natural habitat. Pick a post on a floating pier or observation deck, or jump right in for a guided snorkel, swim, or dive.

Enliven Yourself at the Dead Sea
The salt and minerals in the Dead Sea are so widely considered to be a fountain of youth that millions of visitors come every year to float in the water that sits nearly 1,400 feet below sea level. Not practical in all weather conditions, spas, like the Ein Gedi Spa located on the shores of the Dead Sea, have brought the water’s therapeutic effects indoors with thermo-mineral pools and massages that utilize mud collected directly from the sea.

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